RV Park Owners- How do I improve my Wifi

Discussion in 'Park Management' started by lighthouse_resort, Jan 5, 2020.

  1. lighthouse_resort

    lighthouse_resort
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    So I own an rv park in big bear that has been in business for over 60 years and up till last year we never had Wifi, so last year I put wifi in. I started by putting the main router right near the office and two receivers in trees throughout the park. I have 100 spots in the park that I am trying to give access to wifi but the only quadrant that gets good quality Wifi reception is probably the 20 spots that are near the main router by the office. My rv resort has a lot of trees so I had a feeling that it would be a struggle for the Wifi service to be good throughout the park, any suggestions on how to improve the reception throughout the park? Had anyone else had this problem and used a booster or something that helped?
     
  2. docj

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    With all due respect, you haven't specified what kind of hardware you are using for your router and repeaters. I've encountered some park owners who have tried to use consumer-grade devices and that, typically, doesn't produce an acceptable result. There are companies that design WiFi systems for a living and I suspect they may be able to create a more robust solution for you.
     
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  3. newkcmoedoe

    newkcmoedoe
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    You are going to have major problems. Wifi frequencies (B, G, N and AC) are extremely poor at penetrating items with high water content and that is what leaves on trees are made of. Also, the faster the common frequencies (B being the slowest, N the fastest) the less ability they have to penetrate. The saying in the industry was B would go through walls, G will go through a wall and N will go through the air. AC is a newer format, at 5G frequency only, and is not really an option yet, since many devices will not connect.
    To cover a park, you are going to need multiple routers and access points located around the park. Access points differ from repeaters in that they connect directly to the router and do not repeat the signal which slows the system even more.
    Also of vital importance is the bandwidth you serve the park with. If all that is available to you is DSL or similar, you are almost assuredly wasting your time trying to build out a fast system for 100 sites.
    Finally, remember all internet is two way communication. Even when downloading a huge file, the guest's computer is constantly pinging the system, letting it know it is still connected. This is important because no matter how strong your system is and how well placed your antennas are, the guest's device, with it's two inch antenna and one ounce battery has to be able to communicate back to your system.
    You probably need professional help setting up a working solution. And it may very well be that to provide good service the costs may be prohibitive or even impossible due to limited bandwidth in your area. If that becomes the reality, consider the actual cost/benefits. Do you really want to spend $10,000 or maybe much more to provide Wifi when the customers usually have a data plan on their phones as a backup? Will the business you either lose, or not get in the first place because wifi isn't available cost you more than putting in an expensive system? And if you put in a system, will the customer service issues (and NO campground Wifi system will ever please everyone) be worth the costs?
     
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  4. docj

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    With all due respect, IEEE standards 802.11b, g and n all provide for transmission using the same 2.4 GHz frequency band. All RF transmissions travel at the speed of light; one isn't "faster" than the other. The different standards allow for higher bit rates, but that doesn't have anything to do with the speed of the transmission, nor does a faster bit rate have any direct effect on the penetration ability of the signal.

    802.11n also allowed for transmission in the 5 GHz band but didn't require it.

    802.11ac requires 5 GHz transmission which has nothing to do with the new 5G cellular service. This standard was first implemented in 2013 and by now there are millions of devices owned by consumers that are compatible with it.

    It is true that 5 GHz transmissions will not penetrate as well as do those at 2.4 GHz but that's why most 802.11ac systems have default settings under which they simultaneously broadcast at both 2.4 and 5 GHz.

    If you wish to read a more detailed explanation you can find it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac

    Joel (AKA docj)
     
    #4 docj, Jan 7, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
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  5. newkcmoedoe

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    I don't know how you got the idea I posted or even thought that the physical speed of the radio waves were different. Even you admit that N transmits data faster than B or G. But it is factual that even within the different spectrums (2.4 and 5 GHZ) there are different channels in use. And there is plenty of information indicating that the N and G Wifi has greater potential for interference from other devices using that 2.4 spectrum. From your previous posts it is apparent you believe that poor campground wifi is totally the fault of the campground owner. If you can't stream and upload HD video at a campground in the middle of nowhere you feel it is because the park ownership is just being cheap.
    Since I am apparently swimming upstream against the administration of this website in my belief that many times the issue is that parks cannot, under any reasonable circumstances, provide a wifi experience equal to a home served fiber optic lines and cable wifi, I will save you the time and effort of refuting my views by refraining from future postings on this forum. Drop the mic, I am out of here...For good.
     
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  6. docj

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    With all due respect, you're the one who posted this:

    "Also, the faster the common frequencies (B being the slowest, N the fastest) the less ability they have to penetrate." (emphasis added)

    Without being insulting, 802.11b, g and n don't utilize different frequencies (other than the optional use of 5 GHz with "n"). They have different data rates, not frequencies.

    If you had intended this to say "the faster the data rate (b being the slowest, n the fastest) the less ability they have to penetrate" the statement still would have been incorrect. As I already noted, 802.11b, g and n all use the same 2.4 GHz band (5 GHz being optional for "n") and the exact same channels. Therefore, there is no intrinsic reason why the penetration ability of any of these would differ.

    As for your contention that "g" and "n" are more prone to interference from other sources, that claim wasn't in your original post so my comments weren't intended to address it.

    I had no intention of offending anyone, but I think it's important that material posted in this forum be as accurate as possible. There's an awful lot of incorrect information posted on the internet. The least I can do is help to correct inaccuracies on websites I help administer.

    As for blaming park owners for poor WiFi, I don't disagree that some parks are located in remote areas where high speed internet isn't available. But sometimes the definition of "availability" is highly dependent on how much a park owner is willing to invest in this amenity. In metro areas with strong 4G/LTE service many of us don't care about a park's WiFi; it's in more rural areas where cell service is spotty that a park owner's investment in WiFi will be greatly appreciated by customers.

    Joel (AKA docj)
     
    #6 docj, Jan 7, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
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  7. Josh Z

    Josh Z
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    I think the only thing you can do to improve your wifi is nothing since we would only relly on the signal from networks.
     
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  8. WooodSI

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    I'm not a professional in this field but very less information was provided. We don't know what router is present and provider information for network.
     
  9. Bama Camper

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    Get a professional with experience in that field and a good track record to design a proper system. You'll save money in the long run and have a more reliable system.

    You probably wouldn't do your own appendectomy!
     

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