Toolbox, Fuses, etc?

Discussion in 'Towing, Vehicles, Maintenance and Repairs' started by Travelinbandman, Aug 19, 2020.

  1. Travelinbandman

    Travelinbandman
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    We are new Jayco owners, and I am trying to stock my tool box with the basics as we are about to venture out west for a couple of weeks. Anyone have tips on equipping a small tool box for potential needs? What assortment of fuses? Don't need to be too detailed, but I don't want to forget anything I might need. Thanks!
     
  2. Onemoretrail

    Onemoretrail
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    Did you check to see if the fuses used in your rig are in a specifications table of your operations manual? Sometimes you can get that information online from the manufacturer as well. It is also handy to find out where all the cables, electrical wires, and plumbing are located and that usually is found on the manufacturers website.
    I have a lot of tools for my motorhome, but only seem to use a few of them. A screwdriver with all the different head type bits. A socket set for your wheels. A good tire gauge. If you are electrical wise, a good meter. A pair of pliers, hammer, funnel, and don't forget fluids such as engine oil, antifreeze, power steering and brake fluid, and transmission.
    Whether it is two days or two weeks or even full time, it's always good to have a well equipped tool box. I have mentioned most of the basics, but other members can add other tools and supplies that you may need.
     
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  3. BankShot

    BankShot
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    I have a very well stocked tool box that travels with us as well as a sectioned and labeled box for all the various fuses the coach uses. I always carry WD-40, silicone spray,and a tube of graphite that works wonders on a sticking lock, which by the way has happened to the entry door. And of course a couple of bottles of motor oil, a gallon of distilled water for the batteries, A gallon of antifreeze, jumper cables, an extra length of electrical hookup, an extra fresh water hose along with a 75 foot regular hose; a big box full of various sized bungie cords, a roll each of electrician's tape, duct tape (gotta love that stuff :D), and masking tape, as well as an assortment of various sized light bulbs for the interior coach lights and lamps, etc. Also an extra length of sewer hose and connection pieces, and believe it or not, an extra set of windshield wiper replacement blades. Got caught in rain storm on one trip several years ago and the driver's side wiper blade came apart. Lesson learned on that...:eek: Overall we are pretty much covered for just about anything we need outside of when something unexpected happens where we have to pay a visit to an RV place......................:(

    BankShot................(aka Terry)
     
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  4. Rollin Ollens

    Rollin Ollens
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    I shortened your post as I just wanted to touch on your wiper blade issue. I too experienced the same tragedy. We were caught in a "Hollywood" downpour when mine disintegrated. I was able to pull off of the highway but had to wait until the rain stopped before I could continue. Of course, I bought a new pair (which were quite expensive I might add) and wondered why the originals fell apart. It turns out that, like tires, exposure to the elements is destructive to wiper blades. I now use tennis balls under the wiper arms to keep the blades off the the glass (that gets very hot int the sun) and I have the blades protected with foam pipe insulation. The insulation comes split so they fit snugly over the blades. It's the same principle of tire covers. When I'm parked they go on.

    Darrell
     

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  5. BankShot

    BankShot
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    Hey Darrell - - - Great minds think alike, I use those same split foam tubes to cover my wiper blades whenever we are not out RVing around and they stay on until the wet weather begins. They work very well and for sure keep the rubber blades from rotting away, etc. We replaced both complete wipers, blades and arms, a few years ago. The pair wasn't cheap as you well know...........:eek: Hope all is well up there in Alberta..............

    Regards, Terry............(aka BankShot)
     
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  6. Fitzjohnfan

    Fitzjohnfan
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    I would start with typical socket set and open end wrenches and screw drivers and work up from there.
    It depends on what type of work you plan on doing on your coach. I drive an old 1989 southwind and my running joke is that I can't go on a trip without something breaking or falling off. On top of being a mechanic, you will need to be a plumber, carpenter, and electrician, with all the various tools that go with those trades.

    Invaluable would be a multi-meter to troubleshoot electrical problems. As others said, good duct tape and electrical tape can get you out of many problems with a temporary fix.

    As you build your tool collection, some power tools might be useful. There have been many times my Dremel tool has been helpful to cut out a section of metal or plastic for a quick fix. A drill is also very useful.

    Hope this helps,

    Chris g.
     
  7. mdcamping

    mdcamping
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    Not much more I can add, Chris I like your idea of the Dremel, use it all the time at my job, let me add get the #426 cutting wheels. I also carry with me Hercules Pro Poxy 20 this will bond (like steel) almost anything in 20 minutes, have used it to repair steam coils.

    I tow a travel trailer so I don't carry everything that was suggested but I am making note of all the suggestions for my future Rv (hopefully) :cool:

    Small folding saw, good for cutting that one annoying branch thats scraping the side of your Rv

    Mike
     

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